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A Decisions Query Language (DQL): High-Level Abstraction for Mathematical Programming over Databases

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    Publication properties
    Title: A Decisions Query Language (DQL): High-Level Abstraction for Mathematical Programming over Databases
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    Date: 2009
    Publication type: Conference paper
    Authors:
    No. First name Last name Show
    1. Alexander Brodsky
    2. Mayur Bhot
    3. Manasa Chandrashekar
    4. Nathan Egge
    5. X. Sean Wang
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    Conference Track
    Conference Name: ACM SIGMOD International Conference on Management of Data, SIGMOD 2009, Providence, Rhode Island, USA, June 29 - July 2, 2009 2009
    Track Name: Demo
    URL: http://www.sigmod09.org/

    Abstract

    The demonstrated, high-level decisions query language DQL combines the decision optimization capability of mathematical programming and the data manipulation capability of traditional database query languages. DQL benefits application developers in two aspects. First, it avoids a conceptual impedance mismatch between mathematical programming and data access and makes decision optimization functionality readily accessible to database programmers with no prior experience in operations research. Second, a tight integration provides unique opportunities for more efficient evaluation as compared to a loosely coupled system. This demonstration uses an emergency response scenario to illustrate the power of the language and its implementation.